What is the Right Creativity?

As a creative researcher and someone who has participated in the creative process formally and informally through many projects, I always found it fascinating that the study of the creative process spans into cognitive studies and spiritual studies. My Masters projects even focused on connecting the two. But, is there a gauge for this study? Is there a measure of what are the appropriate ways to study the creative process? There are many individuals who would say, 'yes', and others who state that it is simply a neurological process. Others think that there is a divine element to it all. And, still there are those, many, who think of it as simply a social experience with one's self and others. Yep. And, there are two problems with settling on one of these idea. The studies in all of them are not conclusive and cannot be. Even the Project Zero continues the research. There are two issues that stem from any type of conclusion an any field. One: You can find anywhere on the internet or bookstores materials that has steps or stages to help the creative process. The problem is that the creative process is individualized and cannot be broken down into steps. Two: People love to think of themselves as better or other raise them high with the fallacy of talent. Yep, talent is just skill, knowledge, enthusiasm and other factors that come into play when participating in the creative process. While there are still many who think that talent is a magical force that only some people are given. So, instead of focusing on the study, I focus on research and application. I participate in the creative process and study it as I do with my Creative Study class and with my clients as a Creative Adviser. So, don't question and think of if you should create, just do it and don't allow a book of 'steps' be your guide. Only use it as a simple map, but it's always great to go off roading isn't it? (Below is me storytelling, one of many creative activities I participate in. What are yours?)

Adam C. Sharp Storytelling